Three More from Accent

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Program: #14-24, Air Date: 06/09/14

More late Renaissance and early Baroque music from Austria and Italy in these Dutch/German collaboration.

NOTE: All of the music on this program is from the Belgian-German label Accent. For more information about this label:

 

I. Giovanni Gabrieli: Sacrae Symphoniae (Oltremontano/Gesualdo Consort Amsterdam/Wim Becu). Accent CD ACC 24282.

Giovanni Gabrieli (1554/7?- 1612) is one of the most important representatives of Venetian polyphony; his "Sacrae Symphoniae“ printed in 1597 are a monumental collection reflecting the power and esteem of the Venetian state.
The Ensemble Oltremontano and their director, Wim Becu, have selected the works for this recording primarily from this collection, forming a cross-section of Gabrieli's vocal and instrumental oeuvre. The ensemble, the core of which consists of baroque trombones and zinks, is expanded here by the inclusion of strings and organ; the vocal parts are sung by the Gesualdo Consort Amsterdam.
In the vocal concertos of the "Symphonia Sacrae", we find not only Psalm motets bound to the earlier, lofty Renaissance style, but also hymn-like settings of Marian prayer texts. In addition, there are also purely instrumental works in the "Sacrae Symphoniae" – a novelty for this period. The exactitude with which Gabrieli at times called for specific sound dynamics is shown, first of all, in the "Canzon in echo", but most emphatically in the "Sonata pian e forte", one of the earliest examples of dynamic notation in music history. The predilection of the period for the effects of echoing, changes in timbre and spatial antiphony is reflected in all the works; they are particularly magnificent in the 18-part "Hic est filius Die", which forms the brilliant culmination of this CD.

Deus, qui beatum Marcum a 10, C. 36 - Deus, qui beatum Marcum a 10, C. 36
> Sacrae symphoniae (1597) - Sacrae symphoniae (1597): Canzon primi toni a 8
> Cantate Domino a 6, C. 6 - Cantate Domino a 6, C. 6
> Sacrae symphoniae (1597) - Sacrae symphoniae (1597): Sonata pian e forte a 8
> Miserere mei Deus a 6, C. 9 - Miserere mei Deus a 6, C. 9
> Sancta Maria succurre miseris a 7, C. 13 - Sancta Maria succurre miseris a 7, C. 13
> Exaudi Deus orationem meam a 7, C. 12 - Exaudi Deus orationem meam a 7, C. 12
> Canzoni et sonate (1615) - Canzoni et sonate (1615): Canzon VIII a 8
> Sacrae symphoniae (1597) - Sacrae symphoniae (1597): Canzon duodecimi toni a 8
> Beata es, virgo Maria a 6, C. 8 - Beata es, virgo Maria a 6, C. 8
> Sancta et immaculata virginitas a 8, C. 25 - Sancta et immaculata virginitas a 8, C. 25
> Maria virgo a 10, C. 35 - Maria virgo a 10, C. 35
> Sacrae symphoniae (1597) - Sacrae symphoniae (1597): Canzon in echo duodecimi toni a 10
> Surrexit Christus a 11, C. 66 - Surrexit Christus a 11, C. 66
> Canzon No. 27, "Fa sol la re" - Canzon No. 27, "Fa sol la re"
> Hic est filius Dei a 18, C. 132 - Hic est filius Dei a 18, C. 132

 

II. La Tarantella nel Salento (Ens./Liuwe Tamminga). Accent CD ACC 24236.

The tarantella is an ecstatic folk dance from southern Italy with a long tradition extending to the present day. It actually came into being as a form of therapy following a tarantula bite: the musicians came to the patient's house, to the marketplace or church, and began playing. The victim of the bite danced to the point of total exhaustion in order to drive the spider's poison out of the body. The present CD is the result of the organist Liuwe Tamminga's longstanding occupation with this repertoire, notated between the 17th and 20th centuries, which has always exerted a great fascination on musicians. The special attraction of this recording lies in the fact that it combines outstanding historical organs from Apulia with a number of 'therapeutic' instruments: tambourine, castanets and triangle underline the rhythm whilst providing strong accents, and various plucked instruments such as the guitar and mandolin enter into a dialogue with the organ.

anon.:

Tarantella pugliese

Pizzica taranta

Varias Tarantelas

Pizzica tarantata

La vera tarantella napoletana

Pastorale con i Flautini

Canzone

Pastorale in C

Pastorale in E flat

Pastorale gallipolina

Pizzica pizzica tarantina

Tarantella calabrese

Pastorale in B flat

Tarantella napoletana

Caresana:

Tarantella

Clementi:

Tarantella (c.1800)

Greco, G:

Tarantella con varie partite

Hérold:

Tarantella precede du chant des Zampugni

Huete:

Tarantela

Kirchner, A:

Antidotum Tarantulae

Tarantella, Tono hypodorico

Tarantella, Ottava siciliana

Marchetti, T:

Tarantella

Murcia:

Tarantelas

Rossini:

Soirées musicales: La Danza

Storace, Stefano:

The Tarantula Tune

Vecchiotti:

Pifarata Napolitana

Pastorale

 

III. Dialoghi con l’Angelo:Dramatic Cantatas and Popular Songs (1657) (Nuovo Aspetto/Michael Dücker). Accent CD ACC 24290.

The famous 'Passacalli della Vita' aria, a genuine hit on the Early music scene, has been rumoured not to be an original composition from the 17th century at all, but the work of a present-day musician. Lutenist Michael Dücker has attempted to get to the bottom of this story, and obtained a copy of the printed edition ostensibly containing the song. As things turned out, not only was the sought-for aria original, but there were many other musical treasures hidden in this bundle of approximately 200 pages.
In this printed edition of 1657, of which only a few copies survive today, Francesco Ratis, organist of the Oratorium Order at Chiavenna, compiled numerous popular and folkloristic canzonette and provided them with spiritual texts. The aim of this music was to convert the listeners with catchy melodies to dialect texts, thereby encouraging them to be pious. The most exciting and interesting item in the bundle is a type of miniature oratorio hidden at the end of the collection. It consists of four dialogues featuring angels, demons and musicians who, in each case, confront personified figures such as the soul, the world, the conscience and the body. Ratis primarily transformed the dialogues in a songlike fashion. Through richly-coloured instrumentation (e.g. psalterium, harp, trombone and baroque guitar) the Ensemble Nuovo Aspetto brings out the various characters in a particularly vivid manner. Several instrumental works of this period have also been included as a supplement.
Francesco Ratis: Ciaccona di Paradiso e d'Inferno

Ciaccona di Paradiso e d'Inferno

Stefano Landi: Sinfonia

Sinfonia No. 2

Francesco Ratis: Dialoghi con l'Angelo

Dialoghi con l'Angelo: O Musico t'annuntio un gran lamento

Francesco Ratis: Non si va al Cielo

Non si va al Cielo

Francesco Ratis: Per malum velle (after T. Merula's Quand'io volsi l'altra sera)

Per malum velle (after T. Merula's Quand'io volsi l'altra sera)

Stefano Landi: Sinfonia No. 3

Sinfonia No. 3

Tarquinio Merula: Canzoni overo sonate concertate per chiesa e camera, Book 3, Op. 12

Canzoni overo sonate concertate per chiesa e camera, Book 3, Op. 12: La Ruggiero

Francesco Ratis: Dialoghi con l'Angelo

Dialoghi con l'Angelo: Anima bella per il Ciel creata che custodir

Bernardo Gianoncelli: Vana Bergamasca

Vana Bergamasca

Francesco Ratis: Ruger confuso

Ruger confuso

Marco Uccellini: Sonate, arie et correnti, Book 3

Sonate, arie et correnti, Book 3: Aria terza sopra, "Balletto"

Dialoghi con l'Angelo

Dialoghi con l'Angelo: Cosa hai anima triste che si turbata e mesta appari in vista?

Sonate, arie et correnti, Book 3

Sonate, arie et correnti, Book 3: Aria quarta sopra, "La Ciacona"

Dialoghi con l'Angelo

Dialoghi con l'Angelo: Ama Anima Dio sol bonta

Francesco Ratis: Fuga del mondo

Fuga del mondo

Composer Info

Giovanni Gabrieli (1554/7?- 1612)

CD Info

Accent CD ACC 24282, Accent CD ACC 24236, Accent CD ACC 24290