A Baroque Christmas

To listen to this show, you must first LOG IN. If you have already logged in, but you are still seeing this message, please SUBSCRIBE or UPGRADE your subscriber level today.

Program: #15-50, Air Date: 12/07/15

This week we journey from the recent recording of Schütz’ Christmas Story to an 18th century Christmas in New World Acadia.

I. Heinrich Schütz: Weinachtshistorie (Dresden Kammerchor & Barockorhester/Hans-Chrstoph Rademann). Carus CD 83.257.

Heinrich Schütz: Christmas History. Complete recording, vol. 10


Your purchase will help support Millennium of Music.

The tenth volume of the recording of Schütz’s complete works presents the Weihnachtshistorie SWV 435 (Christmas History). The well-known Christmas History is supplemented with additional pieces for the Christmas season, including the Magnificat SWV 468. Under the direction of Hans-Christoph Rademann, the Dresdner Kammerchor and the Dresdner Barockorchester perform together with renowned soloists such as Gerlinde Sämann, Marie Luise Werneburg and Georg Poplutz (as Evangelist).

--Magnificat SWV 468

-- Hodie Christus natus est SWV 456

--Heute ist Christus, der Herr, geboren SWV 439

--Ach Herr, du Schöpfer aller Ding SWV 450

--O bone Jesu, fili Mariae SWV 471

--Historia Der Freudenreichen Geburt Jesu Christi SWV 435

 

II. Christmas Vespers: Music of Michael Praetorius (Apollo’s Fire/Jeanette Sorrell). Avie CD AV2306.

AV2306_AF_praetorius_cover_web_750


Your purchase will help support Millennium of Music.

From Jeannette Sorrell:

Music is a precious gift of God. When I hear music, joy bubbles up inside of me. Anyone who does not respond to this gift is a clod and not fit to be called a man.
–Martin Luther, 16th century

Martin Luther was a man of strong opinions. He did not like the Pope. Specifically, he did not like 95 things that the Pope was doing, so he nailed a list of his 95 complaints to the door of a church in 16th-century Germany. And thus was born the Reformation.

Luther’s agenda was to empower each man and woman to think independently, to study the Bible on his own, and to participate actively in the worship service. Though it is well known that Luther translated the Bible from Latin into German so that the common people could read it, it is less well known that he adapted both Gregorian plainchant and popular German tavern songs and brought them into the church. Luther was passionate about music, and was responsible for making congregational singing an important part of the Lutheran service. He composed many chorale (hymn) melodies that are still part of the Protestant musical tradition today, including several heard on this recording.

Martin Luther had many students and disciples. One of them was named Praetorius, and that student had a son named Michael. Michael became – along with J.S. Bach – one of the two greatest composers in the history of Protestant church music. Living at the same time as Monteverdi, the great revolutionary composer of Italy, Praetorius was aware of the new and virtuosic elements of Monteverdi’s music; however, he firmly upheld Luther’s ideal that the common people should be able to participate in the music-making in some way. Therefore, while Monteverdi’s music requires an entirely professional ensemble of virtuoso singers, such as existed at St Mark’s in Venice, Praetorius channeled his imaginative flair toward writing music that brought together professional singers, humble village choirs, children’s voices, and even congregational singing.

Thus, Praetorius’ music combines the drama and virtuosity of something like the Monteverdi Vespers, with the simple and accessible traditions of Lutheran hymn-tunes that many Protestants know by heart. Praetorius wanted children to participate, and thus many of his pieces are scored for children’s voices singing a familiar chorale tune, while professional soloists and instrumentalists weave more virtuosic variations around them.

8. GLORIA: Glori sei Gott, from PC (6:57)
AWAITING THE MESSIAH: A LUTHERAN ADVENT SERVICE
1. PROCESSIONAL: Nun Komm der Heiden Heiland
Chorale melody by Martin Luther, arrangement/English adaptation Sorrell
2. Nun Komm der Heiden Heiland
Polyphonic setting from Polyhymnia caduceatrix (PC)
3. HYMN: Wachet Auf! From PC
4. CAROL: Puer Natus in Bethlehem, from PC
5. OFFERTORY: Ach, Mein Herre, from PC
Nell Snaidas, Jolle Greenleaf, Sandra Simon
6. CREDO: Wir glauben all
Melody by Martin Luther, harmonized setting from Musica Sionae (MS)
7. Dances from Terpsichore
Bransle de Poictu – Gaillarde – Bransle gay – Bransle simple – Bransle double
8. GLORIA: Glori sei Gott, from PC
A VESPERS SERVICE FOR CHRISTMAS DAY
9. HYMN: Queen Pastores, from Puericinium
10. ANTIPHON: Christum wir sollen loben (plainchant)
Chorale melody by Martin Luther
11. MAGNIFICAT, Parts I & II, from PC
12. CAROL: O Morning Star, from PC
13. MAGNIFICAT, Parts III & IV
14. CAROL: Lo, How a Rose E’er Blooming, from MS
15. Our Father in Heaven, from MS
16. BENEDICTION: Benedicamus aeterno Regi, from Eulogodia Sionia I (1611)
17. ORGAN VOLUNTARY: Nun lob mein Seel, from MS
18. CLOSING HYMN: In dulci jubilo / Good Christian Friends, Rejoice! From PC

 

III. Suzie LeBlanc—La Veillée de Noël (Atma CD ACD2 2523).

La Veillée de Noël


Your purchase will help support Millennium of Music.

From the CBC Review: The Christmas season is upon us, bringing with it a host of cherished traditions. Perhaps for you it's the practice of putting an orange in the toe of the Christmas stocking; maybe it's the yearly deciphering of a stained and ancient piece of paper with great-grandmother's fruitcake recipe.
Or maybe it's the music. For many people, a particular repertoire of songs and compositions are what trigger the season most powerfully in the mind. A favourite carol or a hint of instrumental melody can bring forth a flood of emotion and memories. And the sharing of this repertoire of music is part of bringing new loved ones into the fold — it's a means of demonstrating who you are, and where you've come from.

With her new Christmas CD, called La Veillée de Noël, soprano Suzie LeBlanc invites us to share her joy at discovering a repertoire of Christmas music from her Acadian heritage. As LeBlanc tells the story, her cousin from Memramcook, N.B., rescued an old book of songs from a local college — songs that her Acadian ancestors brought with them from France and passed down from generation to generation.

LeBlanc's eye was particularly drawn to a section of the book called "Noëls Anciens," a collection of tunes written to cover the entire Christmas cycle, from Christmas itself to the early February feast of Candlemass. These old tunes, many of them named for the region in France where they were first written, tell us about stars and angels, shepherds and wise men, all with captivating Acadian melodies and toe-tapping rhythms.

Of particular appeal are the tasteful and varied arrangements bestowed on these tunes by LeBlanc and her musical colleagues: David Greenberg, Alexander Weimann, Jac Gautreau, Nick Halley, Danny Parker and Steve Normandin. Multiple folk elements are at work here, as well as tinges of jazz in some tracks, resulting in a listen that is an absolute delight from beginning to end.

LeBlanc has shared with us the gift of a musical Acadian Christmas. If you choose to welcome it into your own traditions, it's sure to give back generously for years to come.

1. La Veill‚ée

2. No‰ël Lorrain / No‰ël Populaire

3. O Dieu l’‚étrange chose

4. No‰él de Cluny

5. No‰él Dijonnais

6. Les Trois Mages

7. No‰él Auxois

8. Plus on est de fous, plus on rit

9. Up and down the southern shore

10. No‰ël de Paris

11. Cantique de No‰ël

12. Joseph cherchant un logis

13. Les Cloches

14. Sir Symon the King / La Chandeleur

15. Escaouette

16. Plus on est de fous, plus on rit

PART 1
AWAITING THE MESSIAH: A LUTHERAN ADVENT SERVICE
1. PROCESSIONAL: Nun Komm der Heiden Heiland (3:15)
Chorale melody by Martin Luther, arrangement/English adaptation Sorrell
Scott Mello & Kirsten Sollek cantors
2. Nun Komm der Heiden Heiland (5:09)
Polyphonic setting from Polyhymnia caduceatrix (PC)
3. HYMN: Wachet Auf! From PC (2:47)
Jolle Greenleaf, Kirsten Sollek, Ryan Turner, Paul Shipper
4. CAROL: Puer Natus in Bethlehem, from PC (4:49)
5. OFFERTORY: Ach, Mein Herre, from PC (7:42)
Nell Snaidas, Jolle Greenleaf, Sandra Simon
6. CREDO: Wir glauben all (5:35)
Melody by Martin Luther, harmonized setting from Musica Sionae (MS)
Nell Snaidas, Jolle Greenleaf, Sandra Simon
7. Dances from Terpsichore (4:26)
Bransle de Poictu – Gaillarde – Bransle gay – Bransle simple – Bransle double
8. GLORIA: Glori sei Gott, from PC (6:57)

A VESPERS SERVICE FOR CHRISTMAS DAY
9. HYMN: Queen Pastores, from Puericinium (3:13)
Abigail Clark, Allison Paetz, Allison Miller, Patrick Conklin
10. ANTIPHON: Christum wir sollen loben (plainchant) (0:49)
Chorale melody by Martin Luther
11. MAGNIFICAT, Parts I & II, from PC (5:57)
12. CAROL: O Morning Star, from PC (2:57)
Abigail Clark & Madeline Apple Healey
13.MAGNIFICAT, Parts III & IV (7:32)
14. CAROL: Lo, How a Rose E’er Blooming, from MS (1:40)
15. Our Father in Heaven, from MS (1:02)
16. BENEDICTION: Benedicamus aeterno Regi, from Eulogodia Sionia I (1611) (0:49)
Paul Shipper
17. ORGAN VOLUNTARY: Nun lob mein Seel, from MS (2:33)
Michael Sponseller, organ
18. CLOSING HYMN: (7:14)
In dulci jubilo / Good Christian Friends, Rejoice! From PC
Verse 1: Madeline Apple Headley, Jolle Greenleaf, Scott Mello
Verse 4: Peter Simon, Sandra Simon, Jolle Greenleaf

- See more at: http://www.avie-records.com/releases/christmas-vespers-music-of-michael-praetorius/#sthash.cTsPHQfN.dpuf

PART 1
AWAITING THE MESSIAH: A LUTHERAN ADVENT SERVICE
1. PROCESSIONAL: Nun Komm der Heiden Heiland (3:15)
Chorale melody by Martin Luther, arrangement/English adaptation Sorrell
Scott Mello & Kirsten Sollek cantors
2. Nun Komm der Heiden Heiland (5:09)
Polyphonic setting from Polyhymnia caduceatrix (PC)
3. HYMN: Wachet Auf! From PC (2:47)
Jolle Greenleaf, Kirsten Sollek, Ryan Turner, Paul Shipper
4. CAROL: Puer Natus in Bethlehem, from PC (4:49)
5. OFFERTORY: Ach, Mein Herre, from PC (7:42)
Nell Snaidas, Jolle Greenleaf, Sandra Simon
6. CREDO: Wir glauben all (5:35)
Melody by Martin Luther, harmonized setting from Musica Sionae (MS)
Nell Snaidas, Jolle Greenleaf, Sandra Simon
7. Dances from Terpsichore (4:26)
Bransle de Poictu – Gaillarde – Bransle gay – Bransle simple – Bransle double
8. GLORIA: Glori sei Gott, from PC (6:57) - See more at: http://www.avie-records.com/releases/christmas-vespers-music-of-michael-praetorius/#sthash.cTsPHQfN.dpuf

Composer Info

Heinrich Schütz, Michael Praetorius, Suzie LeBlanc

CD Info

CD 83.257, CD AV2306, CD ACD2 2523.